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Dracula chapter 2 quizlet

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Want more deets? InBram Stoker took central European folk tales and turned them into one of the most famous horror books of all time.

But the CW isn't going to be speccing a script about this guy anytime soon—at least, not Dracula as Stoker wrote him. Stoker's Dracula isn't young and sparkly-hot; he's creepy, old, and has a penchant for turning into bats and clouds of mist. Creepy, old, and occasionally downright boring just stop with the train schedules, Mina —yes. Just like today, vampires in stood in for a lot of contemporary fears and anxieties.

Except while the vampire craze of the s can be read as representing fears of corruption and conspiracy theoriesye olde turn-of-the-century bloodsuckers represented the increasing globalization of London, the risks of sexual activity, or even the increasing presence of technology.

That's right: technology. Just like that creaky rom-com You've Got Mail hinges on the wacky new technology of email, Dracula hinges on telegraphs, typewriters, and phonographs—only with much more gruesome results. Here's the quick version: Count Dracula leaves his native Transylvania modern-day Romania, in southeastern Europe to immigrate to England—presumably to feed on the "teeming millions" in the huge capital city of London. Authors like Rudyard KiplingH. Wellsand Sir Arthur Conan Doyle all wrote sensational adventure stories about fantastic creatures or threatening monsters from around the world.

Stoker didn't think of himself as a great artist; he was primarily a businessman. He managed the famous Lyceum Theatre in London. Stoker only wrote novels to pay the bills hah! Honestly, he'd probably be astonished at the lasting impact Dracula has had. He wrote it in a piecemeal, haphazard way—a little here, a little there. At the time it came out init was popular and well-received, but hardly a blockbuster hit.

It wasn't until later in the 20th century, when film versions of the novel started to appear, that the novel's popularity really skyrocketed and its impact on popular culture became crystal-clear. You don't have to think vampires are dreamy to think Dracula is important. In fact, you don't even have to like Dracula to think Dracula is important: It just is.This novel is not told in a straightforward, chronological, omniscient manner, like many nineteenth-century novels.

Instead, it is composed of a collage of letters, journal entries and diary jottings, in addition to a portion of a ship's log, various newspaper clippings, and even a "phonograph diary.

Stoker most likely borrowed this approach to his novel from Wilkie Collins, who used the same technique in his "detective" novel The Woman in White Jonathan Harker's journal entries begin on May 3, sometime in the late nineteenth century.

The young London lawyer has been traveling by train across Europe and is currently in Budapest, in route to Count Dracula's estate, located somewhere in the Carpathian Mountains of Transylvania — the "land beyond the forest. He is favorably impressed with Budapest, and he remarks that already he can tell that he is leaving the Western world behind him and that he is "entering the East," a section of Europe whose peoples and customs will be, for the most part, strange and unfamiliar.

As his journal entries continue, Harker continues to record the details of the exotically spiced meals which he dines on, plus descriptions of the many old castles which he sees perched atop steep hills in the distance.

The train dawdles on through the countryside, and Harker continues to describe the colorfully costumed peasants whom he sees; he is especially fascinated by the local garb of the swarthy, rather fierce looking men of the region, for they remind him of bandits, but he says that he has been assured that they are quite harmless.

Dracula: Chapter 2

At the eve of twilight, when Harker's train reaches Bistritz, not far from the infamous Borgo Pass, Harker disembarks and checks into the "delightful. Before retiring for the night, Harker reads a note of cordial welcome from Count Dracula, then he records some of the local stories about the Pass, as well as some of the other local beliefs and superstitions. For example, the Borgo Pass marks the entry into Bukovina, and the Pass itself has been the scene of great fires and centuries of massacres, famine, and disease.

Coincidentally, Harker's arrival at Bistritz is on the eve of St. George's Day, a night when "evil things in the world. George's Day. The morning of the departure does not bode well: A considerable crowd of peasants has gathered around the coach, muttering polyglot words which all seem to be variants of the word vampire ; then, almost as if it happens en mass, the crowd makes the sign of the cross and points two fingers at him a superstitious sign of blessing for a good, safe journey.

The coach is off, and in contrast to the rugged road and the feverish haste of the horses, the countryside seems happy, bright, and colorful. But the forest trail, Harker notes, begins to rise ever upward, and soon they begin ascending the lofty, steep terrain of the Carpathian Mountains.

The country peasants, as the coach dashes by them, all kneel and cross themselves, and Harker notes that the hills soon pass into a misty and cold gloom. Evening arrives, and soon they are passing beneath ghost-like clouds, as the coach careens alongside late-lying snows. Harker asks to walk, but his request is denied; foot travel is impossible because of the large number of fierce wild dogs in the woods.

Meanwhile, the driver lashes his horses onward at an ever faster and more furious speed until at last the coach enters the Borgo Pass. The passengers disembark, the horses neigh and snort violently, and the peasants suddenly begin screaming. Simultaneously, a horse-drawn caleche drives up, and the driver instructs Harker that he will take him to Count Dracula. Once inside the caleche, Harker collapses in the close darkness, feeling like a child, cowering within the eerie loneliness.

dracula chapter 2 quizlet

Glancing at his watch, he notices in alarm that it is midnight. A wild howling commences, the horses strain and rear, and wolves begin to gather from all sides as fine, powdery snow begins to fall.

Harker falls asleep, probably from psychological strain and also from physical weariness; when he awakens, the caleche is stopped and the driver is gone. A ring of wolves "with white teeth and lolling red tongues" surrounds Harker.

Dracula (ch. 2) - by Bram Stoker

He feels "a sort of paralysis of fear. There seems to be no one around.Which guides should we add? Request one! Plot Summary. All Symbols Blood Bats. LitCharts Teacher Editions. Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts. The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play. LitCharts From the creators of SparkNotes, something better.

Sign In Sign Up. Dracula by Bram Stoker. Download this LitChart! Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Dracula can help. Themes All Themes. Symbols All Symbols. Theme Wheel.

dracula chapter 2 quizlet

Themes and Colors Key. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Draculawhich you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Jonathan Harker's Journal, May 5. Harker wakes up as the carriage slows before the castle. He is not sure that he is fully awake—the strange driver helps him off the carriage, again with immense strength, and hurls down the bags Harker has brought with him.

The strange driver then leaves Harker before the gates of the castle and disappears. Harker wonders at this treatment since it would be customary for the driver to introduce Harker to the butlerand remarks to himself that he is a solicitor's clerk, in fact a solicitor, having just passed his exam. This is the first the reader learns of Harker's occupation, although his reasons for visiting the Count are still not clear.

The strange driver's strength is perhaps the first real indication that he is more than he seems—that, in other words, the strange driver might actually be Dracula himself, since Dracula, too, is known for his immense strength.

Dracula's Castle does not follow the rules of protocol typical to a great house in England, for example—Harker is not formally "received" there, nor is his arrival announced. This is more evidence, for Harker, that perhaps the Castle Dracula is not a "normal" manor home. Active Themes. Illness, Madness, and Confinement. After waiting in front of the castle's door for some time, Harker hears a man approach: it is Draculawho opens the door, bearing a lamp.

Dracula is tall and wiry, with a white mustache, and though he speaks English well he does so with a strange intonation. Dracula asks Harker to enter "of his own free will" and explains that, since it is late, none of his servants are available to help Harker, thus Dracula will welcome him himself.

Dracula's manner, however, is formal to the point of strangeness. That he speaks English well but with an accent suggests that he can navigate both worlds, the Western and Eastern. It is notable that he asks Harker to enter "of his own free will," since it is later revealed by Van Helsing that Dracula himself can only enter a room or building if invited inside by the party he wishes to attack.

Dracula appears to apply this same rule to his intended prey. Dracula carries Harker's heavy bags, without help, to Harker's room, and bids Harker to come down to dine in a few moments, after Harker has collected himself.Arthur Holmwood, with whom she is very much in love, even though he has not yet professed his feelings for Lucy openly. In a letter later that month, Lucy writes to tell Mina that she has received three marriage proposals on the same day.

The first came from Dr. John Seward, who has charge of a lunatic asylum and to whom she was introduced by Holmwood. The second came from Mr. Quincey P. Morris, an American from Texas. Lucy turned down both proposals because of her love for Holmwood. The day after Lucy turned down his proposal, Seward is questioning one of his patients at the asylum, R.

Holmwood sends a brief telegram accepting the invitation, and promising that he has momentous news for his two old friends. Analysis: Leaving the solitary, isolated Harker for the time being, Stoker shifts in this chapter to two perspectives that highlight friendship: Mina and Lucy, two young women—Mina, slightly older and already engaged; Lucy, younger, more effusive and coquettish and now newly engaged—and Holmwood, Morris and Seward, whose relationship to each other has yet to be disclosed, but which evidently stretches back some time: Morris reminds Holmwood, for instance, that they have done much world traveling together.

dracula chapter 2 quizlet

Wolf fails to note, however, another biblical allusion in this chapter. For her part, however, Lucy also seems quite vain although the quality is presented in a light-hearted manner. Who do you see yourself to be—and is that self-image a true reflection of who you really are? This chapter may be further linked to what has gone before by the emphasis on marriage.

Morris is no vampire, of course presumably! Stoker is developing, early on in his text, some connections between love, eroticism, freedom and slavery that he will further develop. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website.

More Details. Mobile Menu. What are You Studying? Ask Question Novelguide Rooms. Breadcrumb Home Dracula. Dracula: Chapter 5.

dracula chapter 2 quizlet

Facebook share Twitter WhatsApp. Harry Shippe Truman. Herbert Hoover. The Presidency of FDR. James Madison. John Quincy Adams. President Andrew Jackson. President Jackson. The Life of George Washington. Theodore Roosevelt. Thomas Jefferson, Federalist.Which guides should we add? Request one!

Plot Summary. All Symbols Blood Bats. LitCharts Teacher Editions. Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts. The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play.

LitCharts From the creators of SparkNotes, something better. Sign In Sign Up. Dracula by Bram Stoker. Download this LitChart! Teachers and parents!

Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Dracula can help. Themes All Themes. Symbols All Symbols. Theme Wheel. Themes and Colors Key. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Draculawhich you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Mina Murray's Journal. July The narrative jumps forward; Mina has traveled to Whitby, on the northeastern coast of England, to meet Lucyher friend, and to stay with Lucy and her mother in The Crescent, a resort hotel.

Mina describes the beauty of Whitby, the small river nearby, and scenes of the ocean and the harbor. Mina and Lucy are clearly of sufficient economic status and means to be able to take long vacations in the English countryside, near the sea.

Although it is never stated outright, it is strongly implied that all the major characters in the novel, including Dracula, are quite wealthy, and capable of supporting themselves without working. Active Themes. Writing, Journaling, and Messaging. Mina reports of an old man named Swales with whom she converses, overlooking the harbor at Whitby.

Although his dialect is very thick, Mina reports his speech; the old man is about to talk about the olden days of whaling at Whitby before he interrupts himself and says he has to return home. Mina promises to record more of her adventures in the coming days in her journal. Swales, the old man introduced here, is an interesting counterexample to the novel's predominant economic status—he is most certainly not educated, nor is he wealthy, and his knowledge of town custom provides a window onto the town Lucy and Mina otherwise would not possess.

August 1. Mina reports another conversation she and Lucy have with Mr. Swalesthe old man she met previously above the harbor, and two other old men from near Whitby.He is very glad to hear that Carfax the name of the estate he has bought, located in Purfleet, in Essex is an old, perhaps even ancient, house. He keeps Harker talking until dawn, at which time he abruptly takes his leave.

Harker nicks himself. Readers can thus enjoy a sense of dramatic irony, as they are privy to a knowledge that Harker is not—although, to be fair, Stoker is drawing details together from varied sources of vampiric lore; and his novel did much to popularize the image of the vampire in the public imagination.

In this moment, Harker is consciously although not altogether knowingly passing from the realm of the living to the dead; of the light into darkness; of the good into evil. It may prove that what truly makes Dracula a monster is not that he is a vampire, but that he is bent on dominating others. The matter of the blue flames from chapter 1 is revisited in this chapter. Dracula is ostensibly speaking of the blood spilled by patriots and invaders alike in war, but the words more generally apply to the fact that Dracula needs his native soil because, as a vampire, he relies on the blood of others.

We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details. Mobile Menu. What are You Studying? Ask Question Novelguide Rooms. Breadcrumb Home Dracula. Dracula: Chapter 2. Facebook share Twitter WhatsApp. Harry Shippe Truman. Herbert Hoover.Which guides should we add?

Request one!

Dracula: Chapter 5

Plot Summary. All Symbols Blood Bats. LitCharts Teacher Editions. Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts. The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play. LitCharts From the creators of SparkNotes, something better.

Sign In Sign Up. Dracula by Bram Stoker. Download this LitChart! Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Dracula can help. Themes All Themes. Symbols All Symbols. Theme Wheel. Themes and Colors Key.

LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Draculawhich you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Jonathan Harker's Journal, May Harker awakens in the morning in his own room. He fears, at first, that the events of the previous night were a terrible dream, but sees that his clothes have been folded in a fashion not his own; Harker believes that Dracula has carried him back to his room after the episode with the three women.

Harker is glad to know, however, that Dracula has not found Harker's journal hidden in the pocket of his pants. Again, Harker is unable to determine whether the events of the previous night were a dream or reality just as with the "strange driver" and the bizarre ritual of the blue flames by the roadside. Harker still can't conceive of anything beyond his rational beliefs as actually being real. Dracula has not managed to intercept every means of Harker's communication, however—he has not seen Harker's journal, meaning the reader can continue along with Harker's account.

Active Themes. Writing, Journaling, and Messaging. May Harker sneaks out to see if he can get back into the women's room, to find out of the events of that night were real—but the room has been re-bolted shut, and Harker believes that Dracula has done this. Thus Harker believes, more deeply now, that the three women were no dream or vision, but real.

As with any dream, the events of the previous night are lost to Harker—when he returns to the room, he finds he cannot get in, cannot re-experience the trauma of the previous night.

Yet he has begun to push past his rational "prejudices" and believe that the wild things he has experienced are real. Dracula instructs Harker to write three letters: one saying he Harker will leave the castle in a few days; one saying Harker is leaving the next morning from the date of the letter ; and one saying Harker had left Dracula and arrived in Bistritz.


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